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Design Tips Graphic Design Tips

How to perfect your brand presentation

How to perfect your brand presentation : Back in the day, the concept of a full “brand identity design” applied mostly to major corporations with a huge marketing presence. Everyone else got along well enough with just a logo; at best, one that could be stamped on letterhead and business cards too.

Now, even small businesses have to think right from the start about how their brand is going to work across a website (on several types of device), social media, print media, product packaging and swag; and, yes, letterhead and business cards as well.

And you, the designer, have to find a way to present your design in a way that proves it is up to the task. How on earth do you fill such a tall order?

To find the answer, we sifted through the best, most professional and innovative brand presentations and campaigns of 2016—among them Grubhub, Guinness, AT&T and the Tate—to see how the world’s best design firms presented their initial work. We grouped our findings into the 10 categories below.

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1. Illustrate your concept

Most logos have an underlying concept or idea, even a simple one. Manual’s design for Fort Point Beer Company, for example, uses one of the steel trusses from a picturesque bridge near the brewery’s location. By including a handsome photograph of this object in their brand presentation, they really make their concept click.

Illustrate your concept
Image via Manual

The same firm also designed a new identity for the Yerba Buena Center for the Arts in San Francisco. By itself it  might just look like an abstract polygon, but in fact the concept was based on the unique shape of Yerba Buena’s site, and is also meant to represent arrows expanding outward to signify growth. The concept behind this one is a little less obvious, so their map image, which they also animated to illustrate the expansion component, really makes a difference.

Illustrate your concept
Image via Manual

2. Showcase your creative process

As any art lover will tell you, knowing the story behind how a great work was created can really add to your appreciation of it. The same goes for your branding work. DesignBridge had an especially impressive process in creating Guinness’ new, more realistic harp logo. They went to one of the oldest harp manufacturers in the United Kingdom to actually spend time with the instruments and capture their visual essence. They make sure to highlight this special effort in their brand presentation, and also include sketches to show their working process.

Showcase your creative process
Image via DesignBridge

Interbrand took a simple but effective approach in their brand presentation for AT&T. They simply included a collage of photographs documenting their creative process. It gives a sense of the many iterations they considered before arriving at the finished product.

Showcase your creative process
Image via UnderConsideration

3. Distinguish your design from the old one

If a company has hired you to create their first ever brand identity, then you have a clean slate. But if you are replacing an existing one, then you need to make an extra effort to demonstrate how your work is superior to what came before. Wolff Olins‘ approach was to juxtapose their sleek new design (shown at left above) with a motley collage of old brand materials (right), which together show how crude and disjointed the old brand had become.

Distinguish your design from the old one
Image via Wolff Olins

Interbrand’s AT&T design is very similar to the old one. Their task was not a complete overhaul, but rather a small tweak to make the brand more effective across new 21st century media. Thus, their approach to presenting their work was simply to overlay their new design on top of the old one and point out its small but significant improvements.

Distinguish your design from the old one
Image via UnderConsideration

4. Go into detail

Typographic wordmark designs require a tremendous amount of precise crafting. Unfortunately, to a layperson client, it might look like you did little more than select a font. To show them that your design is more than “just a font,” do what Uber did: go in to detail with a grid that shows all the specific lengths, widths and angles that make your wordmark aesthetically successful.

Go into detail

5. Show your design’s flexibility

Recognize that hexagon? It’s the outline of Manual’s logo for Yerba Buena Center for the Arts (discussed earlier). This image is a mockup of how their design could be modified to visually organize Yerba Buena’s advertisements, season catalogs or even signage. Such flexibility is a key value in contemporary branding. If you can show that your design can unify a complex platform of marketing elements, you will be in good shape.

Show your design’s flexibility
Image via Manual

Can you spot the logo here, by Interbrand Australia for Australian Design Center? This “modular” logo’s basic form is the third one from the left, consisting of three simple blocks topped by a triangle. Its genius lies in its flexibility: it is able to expand to incorporate other visual and textual elements, or contract into smaller shapes to fit on smaller screen sizes. If the designer had simply presented the logo’s primary form to the client, it might have seemed ridiculously simple. But by showing its various iterations, it looks marvelously versatile.

Show your design’s flexibility
Image via Interbrand Australia

 

Being flexible doesn’t have to be as complicated as Australian Design Centre’s acrobatic manuever. Wolff Olins made a more simple effort to show how their elegant wordmark can shift and bend into different formations while still being recognizable as the brand that it is.

Show your design’s flexibility
Images via Wolff Olins

6. Prove it is adaptable

This suggestion is similar to the last one, but not quite the same. Proving flexibility means showing your design is capable of shape shifting to work across different environments. Proving adaptability means showing how one single design can maintain its integrity within different parameters. Here, Interbrand shows its client how their logo can look good in front of white backgrounds, black backgrounds, colored backgrounds and photographs—something that was not true of the old, three dimensional looking design.

 

Prove it is adaptable
Image via UnderConsideration

Another example is Design Bridge’s Guinness logo. Here they show how it still looks good in black and white, and in an embossed gold form. Very handsome indeed.

Prove it is adaptable
Image via DesignBridge

7. Justify your color scheme

The color scheme is one of the most tricky and ineffable, yet crucially important, aspects of a brand identity design. There are tons of questionable studies out there about the psychology of color, but at the end of the day it largely comes down to sensible taste. How do you convey something like that to a client? Skip the Pantone swatches and demonstrate your color scheme using real brand elements, like Manual did with their stationery for YBCA.

Justify your color scheme
Image via Manual

Uber took a more more innovative, adaptable approach to color: the color scheme and graphic background patterns for their app change depending on one’s location in the world. This idea is somewhat opaque in theory, so their visual demonstration is very helpful. Each of these collages shows a city and a typical local pattern or landscape, next to the color schemes into which these translate.

Justify your color scheme
Image via UnderConsideration

8. Show off your typeface

Kudos to you if you have the skills to create a custom typeface for your client, like Enchilada (great name, by the way) did for Rotterdams Harmonisch Orkest. But even if you’re just selecting a typeface from existing options—which is totally fine—it’s still a good idea to do what Enchilada did and present an industry-standard sample to your client. Take Enchilada’s cue and ditch “Lorem ipsum” in favor of a brief explanation of why your typeface is the right choice for the brand.

Show off your typeface
Image via Enchilada

9. Put product packages in their best light

Showing off a product packaging design to a client is especially difficult, because you have to convey something three-dimensional using just two. Roll-outs are of course a necessary component, but it’s also a smart idea to show how the design will look in real life. This Budweiser mockup by Jones Knowles Ritchie is especially effective because of how they angle each bottle to provide a view of the design as a whole.

Put product packages in their best light
Image via UnderConsideration

This image by Manual for Fort Point is also a lesson in presentation. By filling up the whole frame with their can designs, rather than having them stand before a white background, they create a much more compelling image.

Put product packages in their best light
Image via Manual

10. Capture every application

Like we said at the start, nowadays designers must assume that their design will appear absolutely everywhere, from tote bags to iPhone screens to architecture. North does a good job of showing how their refresh of the Tate brand will look on pins, t-shirts and even shoes. This photo looks like it is of actual merchandise, but if you are creating a brand presentation for a client, you could easily do something similar in mockup form.

Capture every application
Images via UnderConsideration

This image of Interbrand Australia’s design for Australian Design Centre conveys an important lesson: always try to show how your brand work will look in the actual space where it is going to appear—not just a generic one. If you can add it to a photograph with real people, all the better.

Capture every application
Image via Interbrand Australia

Lastly, don’t forget to keep in mind the hottest, newest technology. Wolf Ollins was quick to show its client, Grubhub, how their design would look on an Apple Watch interface.

Capture every application
Image via Wolff Olins

Via Alex Bigman

Categories
Design Tips UI Design UX Design

What is UI/UX design? What’s the difference?

What is UI/UX design? What’s the difference? UI design and UX design are two of the most often confused and conflated terms in web and app design. And understandably so. They’re usually placed together in a single term, UI/UX design, and viewed from the surface they seem to be describing the same thing. It’s often hard to find solid descriptions of the two that don’t descend too far into jargon. But fear not!

What follows is an easy-to-digest primer on these terms.

By the end of this article, you’ll have a good understanding of what differentiates them and how they relate to each other. So let’s dive in!

What is UI Design?

The “UI” in UI design stands for “user interface.” The user interface is the graphical layout of an application. It consists of the buttons users click on, the text they read, the images, sliders, text entry fields, and all the rest of the items the user interacts with. This includes screen layout, transitions, interface animations and every single micro-interaction. Any sort of visual element, interaction, or animation must all be designed.

This job falls to UI designers. They decide what the application is going to look like. They have to choose color schemes and button shapes — the width of lines and the fonts used for text. UI designers create the look and feel of an application’s user interface.

 

UI design process
UI design process by Ramotion

UI designers are graphic designers. They’re concerned with aesthetics. It’s up to them to make sure the application’s interface is attractive, visually-stimulating and themed appropriately to match the purpose and/or personality of the app. And they need to make sure every single visual element feels united, both aesthetically, and in purpose.

What is UX Design?

“UX” stands for “user experience.” A user’s experience of the app is determined by how they interact with it. Is the experience smooth and intuitive or clunky and confusing? Does navigating the app feel logical or does it feel arbitrary? Does interacting with the app give people the sense that they’re efficiently accomplishing the tasks they set out to achieve or does it feel like a struggle? User experience is determined by how easy or difficult it is to interact with the user interface elements that the UI designers have created.

What is UX Design
Photo by CareerFoundry

So UX designers are also concerned with an application’s user interface, and this is why people get confused about the difference between the two. But whereas UI designers are tasked with deciding how the user interface will look, UX designers are in charge of determining how the user interface operates.

They determine the structure of the interface and the functionality. How it’s organized and how all the parts relate to one another. In short, they design how the interface works. If it works well and feels seamless, the user will have a good experience. But if navigation is complicated or unintuitive, then a lousy user experience is likely. UX designers work to avoid the second scenario.

Designing in a vacuum leads to less than ideal results.

There’s also a certain amount of iterative analysis involved in UX design. UX designers will create wireframe rendering of their interface interactions and get user feedback. They’ll integrate this into their designs. It’s important for UX designers to have a holistic understanding of how users prefer to interact with their applications.

How They Work Together

So a UX designer decides how the user interface works while the UI designer decides how the user interface looks. This is a very collaborative process, and the two design teams tend to work closely together. As the UX team is working out the flow of the app, how all of the buttons navigate you through your tasks, and how the interface efficiently serves up the information user’s need, the UI team is working on how all of these interface elements will appear on screen.

Let’s say at some point in the design process it’s decided that extra buttons need to be added to a given screen. This will change how the buttons will need to be organized and could require changing their shape or size. The UX team would determine the best way to lay out the buttons while the UI teams adapt their designs to fit the new layout. Constant communication and collaboration between UI and UX designers help to assure that the final user interface looks as good as it can, while also operating efficiently and intuitively.

User Interface Design Inspiration
Magic store app. By Yi Li  | this is part of User Interface Design Inspiration post

Research is Key

Research is vital for both UI and UX designers. It’s important for both disciplines to gather as much good information as possible to assist them in crafting appropriate designs, and both follow a similar approach.

Both will research what users want. What they expect from applications of the sort being developed. This research is often iterative, involving usability sessions, where real users will interact with scaled versions of certain functionality or visual designs being tested to determine whether the designers are moving down the proper path. Feedback is integrated with each iteration.

This process involves generating low fidelity prototypes, like wireframe renderings of interface elements in order to gauge a user’s response strictly to the functionality being tested. This can also involve fast visual prototypes and A/B tests of different possible versions of the look and feel of the interface to determine which one users prefer.

In all cases research helps guide the steps designers take as they build their contributions. However, the information UI and UX designers are looking for is very different.

What is UI/UX design
All Screens By Surja Sen Das Raj  | this is part of User Interface Design Inspiration post

Research in UI Designs

UI designers need to make sure the visual language they choose fits the class of application they’re writing. They’re trying to predict user expectations. If your team is designing a travel app, it’s important to research how other travel apps have been developed in the past. Which ones worked? Which ones didn’t? There are design lessons to be learned from the work others have done before.

Research might indicate that people prefer outlined icons instead of bold shapes. This is a visual shorthand that people are comfortable with and enjoy. UI designers would then do well to incorporate that lesson.

The exact aesthetic they choose is up to them, but the basic “rules,” or the need to conform to user expectations, is something designers ignore at their own risk.

Not to say risks shouldn’t be taken. UI designers want their interface designs to stand out and be memorable. But this must be balanced against making sure people recognize the purpose of the elements you’re placing on screen.

UIUX Inspiration
Tourism Service — Mobile App By Anastasia | this is part of User Interface Design Inspiration post

Research for UX Design

UX design is particularly interested in user expectations. All of the experiences and interactions that users have had with every application they’ve used in their lives have helped set their expectations for how interfaces are supposed to work. If a UX designer isn’t intimately familiar with these expectations, they could inadvertently design an interface interaction that seems logical to them but breaks commonly accepted conventions. Users don’t like when an interface behaves very differently than they were expecting, and this could negatively impact their experience.

If a UX designer decides to do something different, they need to have a very good reason, because breaking a deeply trained expected behavior will likely cause people to do the wrong thing frequently.

As an example, most people are comfortable with the idea that you click twice on a file to open it and once to select it. This is an interface behavior that has existed almost as long as there have been graphical user interfaces.

UI Design Inspiration
Touch Panel for Smart Shower By Ivan Balog | this is part of User Interface Design Inspiration post

UI vs. UX: Two Very Different Disciplines that Work in Harmony

UI design and UX design involve very different skill sets, but they are integral to each other’s success. A beautiful design can’t save an interface that’s clunky and confusing to navigate, and a brilliant, perfectly-appropriate user experience can be sunk by bad visual interface design that makes using the app unpleasant. Both UI and UX designs need to be flawlessly executed and perfectly aligned with pre-existing user expectations to create an excellent user interface/experience. And when those stars align the results can be astounding.

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2020

How Clay Christensen changed the way we design

On Jan 25, Clay Christensen passed away from complications from Leukemia. The Harvard professor and The Innovator’s Dilemma author changed our perception of innovation as businesses entered the digital age, taught us how disruptive upstarts can defeat well-established brands, and helped us design better products by showing us that people don’t buy a product: They “hire” it to do a specific job. What’s more, Christensen challenged us to find a path to fulfillment in his best-selling book How Will You Measure Your Life?, which deeply influenced many tech trailblazers, including Steve Jobs.

Clay Christensen“The essence of his work has carried through pretty much every impressive tech innovation and business strategy we’ve seen over the past few decades,” says Sam Dix, Senior Strategist at frog. “It’s such a great loss, not just in business or design, but globally. His voice is so significant in shaping how we think about progress and product.”

Geoffrey Schwartz, Executive Strategy Director at frog’s New York studio, says that Clay’s help in codifying a more detailed language within the innovation world helped him elevate relationships with clients.

“Using a framework like ‘disruptive innovation’ versus just ‘optimizing’ on products or services allows you to understand from mild to wild how far out we should be,” Geoffrey says. “Before it was so blue sky and challenging to communicate organizational needs. His frameworks and terms became a common lexicon to help decipher what ‘good’ looks like, or where we should go.”

Aarron Walter, InVision’s VP of Design Education, says Jobs to Be Done marked a very important shift in thinking about user behaviors. Rather than being informed by a persona, design was hitting something deeper: the idea that products aren’t necessarily bought, but hired to accomplish a job. And that that “need” stems from a larger narrative of motivations and desires that drive a user.

When Walter was at Mailchimp, he used Clay’s ideas on the switch interview process. His design team would get on the phone with customers and map out the forces that caused them to “hire” Mailchimp or even a competitor’s product. They would then come up with a “job story,” or a simple phrase defining the “job” the product was hired to do. While Walter says this process was difficult at first, it eventually allowed them to better uncover user motivations. They could also package their results in a way that they could be easily transferred from team to team, and project to project.

While Clay’s ideas affected day-to-day design practices, they permeated into the designer’s personal lives as well. “His people-centered philosophy is grounding and refreshing, and has hugely influenced how I weigh the transformative influence of human-centered design,” says Emily Campbell, senior design specialist on the Design Transformation team at InVision. “It’s more critical than ever that we adopt his guidance towards humility, learning and compassion. He served us by demonstrating that these traits can ultimately unlock things we only dreamed possible.”

But his human-centric mode of operating was not just a theory. One of the most influential things about him was that he lived his principles. Brian Kardon, InVision’s CMO, first read The Innovator’s Dilemma while at Eloqua. He attests that Christen’s principles helped him defend the company against competition. As a thank you for his ideas, Brian wrote Clay a personal note. Surprisingly, Clay called him back.

“He had a million commitments, but he still made time to hear my story and get specifics,” Brian says. I learned from him that, even at the top of your game, there’s still room to get better, to listen and learn.”

Brian’s story doesn’t end there: A few years later, he saw Clay speak at a Dreamforce conference: Clay had had a stroke and had lost his ability to speak—which, as a Harvard professor, was his livelihood—and told a story about how he relearned with his grandchild. Brian thought this was an amazing story, and approached him after the talk to say so. Remarkably, Clay remembered Brian and their talk about Eloqua. He invited Brian to coffee (for him, tea), and the two had a great conversation.

“Clay was always taking in things. He was never too busy or important to reach out,” Brian says. “There are very few people I respect more than him, less for his intellect as his humanity. His legacy is less about his books and frameworks, as it is a model for how to lead your life.”

 

 

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Featured Illustration Inspiration

International Peace Day Stamps By Stranger & Stranger

International Peace Day Stamps By Stranger & Stranger

International Peace Day StampsStampsStampsStampsStampsInternational PeaceInternational PeaceInternational Peace Day StampsInternational Peace Day Stamps

Strangers and Strangers has unveiled their 2019 project which the United Nations asked them to take on which was to design a collection of mailing stamps to celebrate the world’s international peace day.

They started on a simple concept; first asking, “How do you say peace?”. After that, different colors and elements were used to indicate country’s individual peace focused on themes such as diversity, offerings, and sharing.

What resulted are visually appealing stamps representing not only symbolism of peace but also of culture. The stamps will be used worldwide starting on International World Peace Day which is coming soon.

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UI/UX Inspiration Weekly Inspiration

UI Design Inspiration 19

Every day most digital designers look for inspiration on sources like Dribbble or Behance for mobile and webdesign UI/UX works. In a large stream of the works, it is very easy to miss some quality shots with small number of likes and comments.

We decided to change that and showcase some of the recent cool shots from the design community.

Check out Previous  UI Design Inspiration here

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UI/UX Inspiration Weekly Inspiration

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Every day most digital designers look for inspiration on sources like Dribbble or Behance for mobile and webdesign UI/UX works. In a large stream of the works, it is very easy to miss some quality shots with small number of likes and comments.

We decided to change that and showcase some of the recent cool shots from the design community.

Check out Previous  UI Design Inspiration here

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UI/UX Inspiration Weekly Inspiration

UIUX Interaction Design 41

Every day most digital designers look for inspiration on sources like Dribbble or Behance for mobile and webdesign UI/UX works. In a large stream of the works, it is very easy to miss some quality shots with small number of likes and comments.

We decided to change that and showcase some of the recent cool shots from the design community.

Check out Previous UIUX Interaction Design here

 

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UI/UX Inspiration Weekly Inspiration

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Every day most digital designers look for inspiration on sources like Dribbble or Behance for mobile and webdesign UI/UX works. In a large stream of the works, it is very easy to miss some quality shots with small number of likes and comments.

We decided to change that and showcase some of the recent cool shots from the design community.

Check out Previous  UI Design Inspiration here

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UI/UX Inspiration Weekly Inspiration

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Every day most digital designers look for inspiration on sources like Dribbble or Behance for mobile and webdesign UI/UX works. In a large stream of the works, it is very easy to miss some quality shots with small number of likes and comments.

We decided to change that and showcase some of the recent cool shots from the design community.

Check out Previous UIUX Interaction Design here

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UI/UX Inspiration Weekly Inspiration

UI Design Inspiration 16

Every day most digital designers look for inspiration on sources like Dribbble or Behance for mobile and webdesign UI/UX works. In a large stream of the works, it is very easy to miss some quality shots with small number of likes and comments.

We decided to change that and showcase some of the recent cool shots from the design community.

Check out Previous  UI Design Inspiration here

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